Social Media CheckUp

In today’s professional world, it should be assumed that a company will check a candidate’s social media presence when they are looking for employment with that company. It is important to find out how your potential candidate presents themselves to the world and what they choose to share on social media.

One Job hunter named “Sarah” was in her third and final round of interviews at a company. Unfortunately, she forgot to clean up her Facebook page prior to beginning her job hunt and was not extended an offer because of the passionate and derogatory views that she expressed about a previous employer. Another candidate, “Matthew”, did not remove images that he posted on Instagram of drinking and partying with his friends weekly, and the company decided that they didn’t want to deal with a party animal showing up late to work. They never extended an offer to him either.

As far as employer’s are concerned, in today’s world, everything you choose to put on social media is a direct reflection of who you are. I always advise my clients to clean up their social media accounts prior to starting their job search. On Facebook, it’s not just the images that you post and the information that you put out there, it is also what you have been tagged in. It is wise to look at all of your posts, as well as anything you have been tagged in, and untag, hide or delete prior to beginning your job search. Lastly, there is always the option to suspend your account temporarily while you are on the job market. In this day and age, you must be exceptionally vigilant about what you share on social media and what the content says about you.

When you are looking for your next opportunity, it is extremely important to be at your professional best and to differentiate yourself from other job seekers. We can get you on the right track to get the job you want.

 

 

By |2016-05-18T13:09:47-06:00May 18th, 2016|Career Success, Social Media and Job Searching|Comments Off on Social Media CheckUp

Think Twice Before You Put Content Online…

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When you are looking for a job, hoping to survive a merger or yearning for a promotion at work, are you extra careful with what you put online?

You may think you post appropriate content on professional sites or social networks related to work, like LinkedIN, but be aware that your entire online presence is open to being considered by potential employers, new management or anyone looking to promote an employee. A Google or Bing search can uncover a great deal of your online activity.

Think about the last time your favorite sports team lost the big game or the referees made you mad. Did you comment about that anywhere online?

Do you think Kim Kardashian and Kanye West’s new baby name is ridiculous and went on a rant about it online?

Were you mad about Paula Deen’s racial controversy and indulged in some negative comments on Twitter?

Anything inappropriate you write or post online can come back to haunt you professionally. Your reputation can be built up or put down by the way you engage online. Social networks and blogs are a great way to show your expertise, knowledge and ability to communicate well with others. If you do it right, you can easily enhance your credibility.

Be conscientious of how you present yourself to others online. 

By |2013-06-25T12:20:45-06:00June 25th, 2013|career consultation services, Job Search, Social Media and Job Searching|Comments Off on Think Twice Before You Put Content Online…

4 Tips on How to Use LinkedIn to Get Job Interviews

LinkedIn is a great tool that not every job searcher out there knows how to use the right way. Are you using it to its full capacity?

When conducting a competitive job search, it is important to utilize many different avenues as you look for your next role.  Using a recruiter is an important option to consider.

If you want to reach out to recruiters during your job search, what is the best way to get in touch with them? You may be surprised to know LinkedIn is the answer. Recruiters are very receptive to queries from competitive candidates.

Start with these four tips for the best ways to approach recruiters on LinkedIn.

  • Use the Search Tool – In the upper right hand corner of LinkedIn, select the Advanced People Search. Like Google and Bing, typing in the most specific keywords will find you the best results. Instead of typing ‘IT recruiter’, type ‘technology recruiter for oil and gas in Houston’ or be even more specific.
  • Send a Call to Action Message – After identifying the recruiters you want to contact, you’ll want to be specific about your skills and career goals. This allows the recruiter to see how your qualified you are to apply for the jobs they have available. Often, this first touch stimulates dialogue that allows the recruiter to point out job listings they are working on, or to add you to an internal recruiting database. In addition, some recruiters will suggest you follow their Twitter or blog for the most up-to-date listing of job postings.
  • Keep in Contact – If you find that a recruiter responds to you with a note stating that they’ll “keep your resume on file,” don’t be disappointed. This is a common practice and can indicate that they expect to receive a future request for candidates with your skills. Staying in front of the recruiter is important and it does require effort. Sending a short note via LinkedIn or through email approximately once per month is a great idea to keep your name and your skills top-of-mind when new sourcing requirements cross the recruiter’s desk.

 

Sources: How to Reach Out to Recruiters Using LinkedIn by Laura Smith-Prouix

By |2013-02-26T13:59:09-06:00February 26th, 2013|career search, Social Media and Job Searching|Comments Off on 4 Tips on How to Use LinkedIn to Get Job Interviews

6 Essential Social Media Tips for College Students Preparing for Interviews

1.  Undo the Evidence of Your Summer Fun on Facebook!

Clean your profile of your summer flings. Before school gets back to full swing, you should take some time to review your timeline. Do the pictures paint the story you want to tell your future boss?

2.  Ask Your Friends About Their Summer Jobs

Ever hear the expression, “most jobs come from your network”? Well your college friends are your network, and will become extremely valuable connections for you after you graduate. Find out where your friends worked over the summer.

3.  Rent Your New Textbooks on Kindle

There is something nice about thumbing through a book. But there is also something nice about paying only $19 to rent a digital textbook instead of paying $100 for ten pounds of lower back pain to carry around all semester. With Kindle, you can take notes, highlight and even Tweet favorite passages. Consider renting your required reading instead of buying books.

4.  Update Your Summer Job on LinkedIn

The longer you wait to include your summer work on your LinkedIn profile, the more you’re going to forget the details of what you did. Sure, it might not have been a dream job, but it still counts as work experience. Interviewers say that nothing shows work-ethic more than when a student spends their summer earning their own money rather than spending their parent’s money. So don’t undervalue what you’ve done this summer. Record your work experience in your LinkedIn profile.

5.  Get Summer Job Recommendations Before Your Boss Forgets Who You Are

Not only will you forget the details of your job once school starts, but your boss will probably forget about how much they liked you. With online job seeking, one of the most powerful elements you bring to the table is what other people think about you. In years past, this used to be a very formal process. You’d have to request a letter of recommendation from your boss. Then they’d ask you to write it and they’d sign it. These days, all you need is a few short paragraphs on your LinkedIn profile. These notes from past managers will be assets that will serve you well once you start your career search.

6.  Google yourself to See Your Online Reputation

Go ahead. We dare you. This generation has the unique advantage of being online from an early age. This means you’ve been building an online reputation whether you know it or not. Once your online reputation gets a blemish, it’s rather hard to fix. Use a tool called BrandYourself.com to grade your online reputation and get some free tips for improving it.

 

Reference:

http://www.careerrocketeer.com/2012/09/10-essential-social-media-tips-for-college-students-heading-back-to-school.html

 

By |2012-10-11T09:36:41-06:00October 11th, 2012|Social Media and Job Searching|Comments Off on 6 Essential Social Media Tips for College Students Preparing for Interviews

Be Aware of the Information You Share…

While we encourage you to have a profile on LinkedIn, we don’t recommend posting your resume just anywhere on the web. Here’s why…

With the use of the Internet, it is hard to manage the information that is out there about you. When searching for a job, you want to have as much control as possible. When you peruse a job board for positions you are interested in, apply and submit your resume directly to the company. Don’t share your resume on open job boards for all to see.

Another problem we see frequently with job seekers is stretching the truth about their job experience. While you may think it’s not a big deal to pad your resume or online profile, your result may not be a job offer.

A recent story came to our attention about an employee stating that the were ‘an expert’ in their past field online. Through an easy online search, that past employee ended up being sued because of this slight exaggeration.

In the end, don’t lie, exaggerate or pad information on your resume and then post it on the Internet for the world to see.  It could have very different results that what you intended.

By |2012-09-17T20:47:21-06:00September 17th, 2012|Social Media and Job Searching, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Be Aware of the Information You Share…