When you put content online it can live forever.  When you are looking for a job, hoping to survive a merger or yearning for a promotion at work, are you extra careful with what you put online?  What about the items that have been there for a while?  Do you review your profile and timeline and remove things that could hurt your chances of getting the job?

Put content online

What Did You Put Online?

You may think you post appropriate content on professional sites or social networks related to work, like LinkedIn. But be aware that your entire online presence is open to being considered by potential employers, new management, or anyone looking to promote an employee. A Google or Bing search can uncover a great deal of your online activity.

Think about the last time your favorite sports team lost the big game, or the referees made you mad. Did you comment on that anywhere online?

What about COVID-19 and wearing masks? How about the stay-at-home orders? Did you comment or rant about something related?

Were you mad about the latest racial controversy and indulged in some negative comments on Twitter?

Did you post about the celebration with bottles of alcohol in your hands when the stay at home order lifted?

Were there layoffs in your company or unfair treatment of individual employees you complained about? Or maybe you were an essential worker and complained.

What You Put Online Is Visible To Employers

I’m not saying you shouldn’t have an opinion, just that whatever you are posting is visible to those checking out your profile and could make a difference in how they think of you.

Anything inappropriate you write or post online can come back to haunt you professionally. Your reputation can be built up or squashed by the way you engage online. According to Caroline Vandergriff in the post, Beware on Social Media: Old posts may come back to haunt you, “Big errors can cost you. Old posts could come back to haunt you when it comes time to apply for college or look for a new job.”

Put Content Online2018 Career Builder survey found that 70 percent of employers use social media to screen candidates during the hiring process, and at least 43 percent use it to check on current employees. They reported that the top behaviors that create a bad impression were:

  • Provocative or inappropriate photos
  • Posts about drinking or using drugs
  • Discriminatory comments about race, gender or religion

So think twice before you hit enter. Comments with profanity, mean posts about other people, complaints about work, and comments about partying are just a few of the things posted on social media that can come back to hurt you in the future.

What You Put Online Can Show Your Expertise

Social networks and blogs are a great way to show your expertise, knowledge, and ability to communicate well with others. If you do it right, you can easily enhance your credibility.

Be conscientious of how you present yourself to others online and always ask yourself, is this something I would want a potential employer to see? If it isn’t, then maybe you shouldn’t be posting it.

Do You Need Help With Your Job Search?

If you need help updating your resume or practicing for an interview during these hard times, consider reaching out to me, Rachel Schneider, at Career Find to assist you.

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